Mnangagwa Abandons Former Freedom Fighters
15 October 2021
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JENAGURU Arts Centre founder and musician Clive Malunga has accused Zanu PF of neglecting war veterans, adding that he was seeking an audience with President Emmerson Mnangagwa to air out areas of “great concern.”

Malunga, a war veteran who rose to stardom in the late 1990s through his award-winning song and accompanying video Nesango, said it was sad for the regime to ignore its cadres, who are wallowing in abject poverty.

In an interview with NewsDay Life & Style yesterday, Malunga said government should sympathise with war veterans, who have stood with it through thick and thin.

“I thought by now the ruling party would sympathise with dedicated cadres,” Malunga said.

“What does it take for an individual to be recognised by own country, through hard work and wisdom? If what I advise His Excellency later becomes true, can I not be recognised as someone who has a far-reaching eyesight?” he said.

“I donated a lot of money towards the reburial of former freedom fighters, I raised a lot of money through Zimbabwe-Mozambique Friendship Association, for the safekeeping of the Mutare Beira Corridor railway line,” he said.

“I organised Jenaguru Music festivals, recorded other artistes, honoured artistes, through higher learning institutions, donated stationery to many schools, assisted many orphanages with food and clothing and built tombstones for many musicians, among other things.”

Malunga took to social media to vent his anger.

“Who in Zimbabwe has advised the current President on issues of great concern? It is Clive Malunga, who foresaw the G40 uprising.

“It is the same person who led Cdes to State House, demanding compensation.

“Why do you pretend as if I don’t exist?” Malunga asked rhetorically.

Last year, Malunga was left counting his losses after his Jenaguru Arts Centre built over 25 years ago was razed down by the Harare City Council.

“We are not in Gaza or Palestine where Israelites destroy people’s things and we are not at war with each other. So, the government should make sure these institutions are not run based on partisan lines where people look at where you come from or who you support. There is unfairness in all this,” Malunga said then.

“People in power should make sure institutions are fair, because the blame will always go to Zanu PF. People should not label others or me as sell-outs because I am not a sell-out.”

Malunga’s Nesango video was for years one of the best visual music productions in the country. The video relives some liberation war scenes, with Rhodesian Forces helicopters descending on guerillas, horses chasing suspected guerrillas, military vehicles on patrol and liberation fighters’ pungwes (vigil meetings) with villagers.- NewsDay